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Northwest History. State History box 62. General Research and Experiments.
Northwest History. State History box 62. General Research and Experiments.
Original index titleNorthwest History. State History box 62. General Research and Experiments.
NewspaperYakima Herald Republic; December 10, 1917
TitleCEREAL FOODS BY SIMPLE PROCESS. Chemist Olson of State College Discovers New Way to Make Grain Foods in the Home Kitchen.
DescriptionCEREAL FOODS BY SIMPLE PROCESS. Chemist Olson of State College Discovers New Way to Make Grain Foods in the Home Kitchen.
Subject Keyscereal foods ; Chemist Olson ; Washington State College ; New way to make grain foods in the home kitchen ; Dec 10 ; way to make flour ; stiff dough ; dessication ; reverse nature's process ; Olson process ; bakes products ; dextrinated ; grain is transformed into a sugar-like form ; 1917
Date.Original1917-12-11
Resource Identifiernwh 62-272
SubjectsNorthwest, Pacific -- History -- 20th century
United States - State History -- 20th century
Resource TypeText
LanguageEnglish
Date.DigitalMay 2013
Full-TextCEREAL FOODS BY SIMPLE PROCESS Chemist Olson of State College Discovers New Way to Make Grain Foods in the Home Kitchen. WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE, Pullman, Dec. 10. -(Special to The Herald)-A bulletin of the State college, No. 112, by Chemist Geo. A. Olson, announces the discovery of a way to make flour at home from th whole grain, using for this purpose a food chopper, baking tins, moulding board and stove. This equipment also suffices for the making of cereal foods from such grains as corn, wheat, rye, hulless barley and hulless oats. The whole process is much more simple than that of making cakes, pies and the very plainest of puddings. Mr. Olson's discovery rests upon a scientific fact which a little over a year ago was developed in a satisfactory way by him in some cereal experiments to discover a little more than was the then definitely known about the growing and ripening habits of wheat-or, in fact, any grain. In this work, the fact was proved that when wheat reaches a stage known as the "stiff dough" it is done growing-that is, no more material is transferred from the ripening plant into the round, lump berry. This latter ripening state of the wheat is called "dessication" and amount, in practical terms to the drying off of moisture in the wheat berry. Reverse Nature's Process Mr. Olson's plan to make home-made flour, and cereal and breakfast foods, in reality, works the "dessication" process backwards; that is, he merely soaks the grain. By soaking the grain, he does nothing to it but put water into the kernel, much as it was in the latter ripening stahes, and does not change in the slightest measure any of the properties of the wheat berry by soaking. When the wheat, corn, hulless oats or barley, rye, peas, or any cereal desired is soaked till it is soft, it is run through a food chopper until the material is thoroughly ground up. After this, it is either mixed with sugar, salt, baking powder, fresh or sour milk or other needed items, for the making of whole wheat bread, corn meal gems or muffins, or any desired baked product. The soaked and pulverized material, either corn meal or wheat meal, rye, barley , oats, or peas, used separately or in any desired combination answers excatly the purpose of these meals when used in dry form. The Olson process applied in the making of cereal foods can be used in numerous ways. The crushed material of corn, wheat, oats or barley is thoroughly baked. It can be shortened with lard or cottonseed oil, flavored, salted or sweetened, or mixed with dried or fresh fruit. After baking is done, it is crushed in a granular form by the use of rolling pins and board, and will keep when stored in jars. The material may be "flaked" by rolling the crushed material out in thin layers, then baking, and breaking up the baked, thin layers in any size desired. Unique Application A unique application of the newly invented Olson processs is accomplished by boiling corn, or wheat, in lieu of soaking. By doing this, and then putting the freshly boiled corn through a chopper, and drying and sifting, one is able to make cooked corn meal, when merely mixed with hot water, instantly becomes hot corn meal ready for use. Flour of this kind, cooked, can be made into baked products which have an advantage in palatability, owing to their being so well cooked. Tests that been made in the State college laboratories establish clearly, the thorough digestability of this kind of breakfast food-due to the fact that the grain is thoroughly cooked in the baking process, and, also, in the last stages of the process it is well "dextrinated, "meaning tha the starch of the grain is transformed into a sugar-like form which is readily assimilated.
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